“Having finished university, I find myself in a scenario in which I am clueless about what I am passionate about and what makes me different.”

“Without education your life is nothing” is the constant reminder my mother used to tell me in my early years. But looking back now I see that my mother was right and wrong at the same time.

I grew up in a household in which education is seen as the only access to a successful life – the “9 to 5 life”. But having finished university I’ve learnt to dislike education and in having listened to Robert Greene, I have come to a conclusion that the education system that we are in is what I dislike about it. Reason being is because as children we have basic inclinations towards a subject that we loved and felt connected to. Some children may have a connection to physical activities, writing activities, activities that require creativity, etc. Children have this natural inclination towards a ‘thing’, and me personally I don’t know what it is because I believe that the education system has distracted me from discovering my passion and my ‘thing’ that I felt inclined to as a child. The education system is somewhat like a dictatorship in which you have to follow a repetitive process which requires you to study Maths, English, Science, ICT, etc. and be good at these subjects and pass exams to get into a Russell group university and then find a ‘9 to 5’ job and work for the rest of your life. Eventually you lose touch of who you are, what makes you different/unique and what you love in life. Having finished university, I find myself in a scenario in which I am clueless about what I am passionate about and what makes me different, forcing me to enter the real world as a product of an education system that converts humans into machines for the benefit of the economic system.

University has been a very interesting element in to my life as it has helped me understand how it’s segregated from the real world. The reason I say this is because, as young adults we are not aware of what the real world is like so we create this bubble that’s the complete opposite of it is. We worry about our appearances more than who we are, we look to intoxicate our minds rather than to develop our minds, and the list goes on. It’s a plague that everyone adopts to fit in, and it goes to the extent of effecting your perception on the concept of relationship between people in which you befriend them because of silly reasons like they attract most of the opposite sex or they get the most attention because of their long, lustrous hair. The point is that sometimes we make friends with people because of what we see outside of them rather than their good character, and good intentions, and I find university developing the student life environment based on these flaws (but the university is not to blame).

However, on a positive note, I do find university as a great eye opener as it has allowed me to meet people from different parts of the world in which you get to understand different cultures and how life is in different parts of the world. Also it’s a great place to access different societies and try out new things that’ll allow you to discover your passion in which you can take with you when you graduate. Overall, university is a great place to have fun and to meet new friends as well as to try new things that will allow you to find your passion. But there is a side to university that’s not healthy and could affect your mental growth but all of that can be avoided through discipline and standing by the things you believe.

-Musab Saleh

3 Comments

  • So true, however it is determined by your mindset and how you view education, as it shouldn’t be your only path. But one of a few.

  • This is really interesting, the vast options of subjects are there to cater nearly all interests. So perhaps its the strive for monetary gain and the mindsets of family and friends which have huge implications on an individuals decisions.

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